Past Events

10/28/2014 (All day)

The State of Donations: Individual Charitable Giving in Los Angeles

Tuesday, October 28, 2014 - 8:30 am-11:30 am 

Skirball Cultural Center
Herscher Hall-Guerin Pavilion
2701 N. Sepulveda Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90049 

Our latest report provides nonprofit executive directors, board members, and fund-raisers with a useful guide to what is known and what matters when it comes to individual giving and informs donors to better understand the patterns, effects, and challenges of charitable giving in Los Angeles County.

This event is at capacity.  Please check back to download a copy of our latest report.

 

05/14/2014 - 12:00pm

Sasha Issenberg, Civil Society Fellow at UCLA Luskin and Washington correspondent for The Monocle, a magazine covering global affairs, business culture and design, will discuss his 2012 book The Victory Lab: the Secret Science of Winning Elections, which shows how political campaigns have been transformed by innovations in data, analytics, and behavioral psychology. 

While at UCLA, Mr. Issenberg is writing a book on marriage equality to be published by Crown/Random House, The Engagement: A Quarter-Century of Defending, Defining, and expanding Marriage in America that documents the political, legal, and social history of the battles over gay marriage in the United States.  In addition, Mr. Issenberg is co-teaching a Fiat Lux undergraduate course, Victory Lab, Exploring the Mechanics of Modern Campaignswith Lynn Vavreck of the Political Science Department.  

Mr. Issenberg has held editorial and reporting positions for George, Philadelphia Magazine, The Boston Globe, and Slate. He has also published articles in a wide range of major publications including the New York Times Magazine, New York, the Atlantic, and the Washington Monthly. He is also the author of The Sushi Economy: Globalization and the Making of Modern Delicacy (Gotham/Penguin, 2007), which describes how sushi went from a street snack to a major global commodity in less than a decade. He was a Fellow of the Institute of Politics at the Harvard Kennedy School Institute of Politics in 2013. He is a 2002 graduate of Swarthmore College.

05/01/2014 - 12:00pm

Sasha Issenbergpolitical journalist and Fellow in the Center for Civil Society in the Luskin School of Public Affairs and the UCLA Department of Political Science, will discuss his upcoming book on marriage equality, The Engagement: A Quarter-Century of Defending, Defining, and expanding Marriage in AmericaThe Engagement will document the political, legal, and social history of the battles over gay marriage in the United States. 

Mr. Issenberg is currently Washington correspondent for The Monocle, a magazine covering global affairs, business culture and design. He is the Author of The Victory Lab: the Secret Science of Winning Elections (Crown, 2012), which shows how political campaigns have been transformed by innovations in data, analytics, and behavioral psychology. He is also the author of The Sushi Economy: Globalization and the Making of Modern Delicacy(Gotham/Penguin, 2007), which describes how sushi went from a street snack to a major global commodity in less than a decade.  Mr. Issenberg’s UCLA Fellowship is supported in part by a generous contribution from the David Bohnett Foundation.

 

08/28/2013 (All day)

August 28, 2013, Sacramento, CA – The Los Angeles Urban League (LAUL) released a whitepaper today highlighting research from the UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs that revealed a core problem in Los Angeles County that is impacting quality of life for urban communities: the middle class is declining with the stagnation of income levels and job opportunities.

The UCLA data indicated that in Los Angeles County, certain areas are seeing growth in jobs and income, and others are experiencing job loss and a reduction in personal income. However, an alarming third trend has emerged: a significant part of Los Angeles is experiencing a growth in jobs – but those jobs are lower-wage and lower growth opportunities. As a result, the middle class is disproportionately shrinking.

For example, UCLA researchers found that over the period from 1990-2010, new jobs added to the metropolitan Los Angeles region were in industries that paid an average of $52,840 – replacing jobs lost in industries that paid an average wage of $76,003.

The report also found that Los Angeles lags behind in educational achievement. In addition to large discrepancies in economic recovery between regions, the greater metropolitan area is falling behind in developing an educated, well-trained workforce.

“A Tale of Three Cities” indicates that a strong metropolitan economy is the best antidote for community poverty and economic stagnation. The goal for the Los Angeles area must be economically healthy, robust, vital communities throughout the County, with middle income jobs that provide a high standard of living. Economic opportunity and stability are key factors associated with improved quality of life.

“It will take leadership, engagement and commitment to re-build the middle class and ensure there are opportunities for upward economic mobility for all Los Angeles County residents,” said Nolan Rollins, president of the Los Angeles Urban League.  “We look forward to working with the Governor and Legislature to develop policies and programs that support our businesses, train our workforce and bring high-wage jobs to the great state of California.”

The Los Angeles Urban League is calling on policymakers to take action to restore opportunities for economic parity, which will come from the implementation of state and local policies that support business development, create jobs, and restore economic vitality to the inner city communities. Specifically, LAUL recommends three immediate policy initiatives:

  • Remove the barriers: Re-examine state and local policies that are pushing middle-income jobs to other states and locations, and take immediate action to mitigate those impacts; 
  •  Train the workforce: Develop a blueprint for educational parity, including early childhood education and workforce training opportunities that align with growth industries;
  •  Bring the jobs: Establish certainty for companies that are currently operating or are seeking to operate in metropolitan areas by ensuring a competitive economic environment by stabilizing regulations and reforming our business climate to create stable jobs.

LAUL President Nolan Rollins presented findings from “A Tale of Three Cities” today at the State Capitol at a commemoration of the 50-year anniversary of the March on Washington, D.C. hosted by Assemblymember Shirley Weber and the California Legislative Black Caucus.  

“This report raises critical questions about the two-tier economy arising from the disparity of our state’s economic recovery, especially in Los Angeles County, one of the biggest and most diverse counties in the nation,” said Rob Lapsley, President of the California Business Roundtable. “It shows that there is a significant need for state and local officials to consider why quality, middle class jobs are leaving the state and being replaced by lower wage jobs.” 

The Los Angeles Urban League, in partnership with the California Business Roundtable, commissioned UCLA’s Luskin School of Public Affairs to examine California’s business climate to better understand the impact of a struggling economy on urban communities. After two community forums, the report is a product of the UCLA Luskin School analysis, the community’s engagement and input, and the Los Angeles Urban League’s call to action.